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Jason Cohen has been an active investor within the Pittsburgh real estate community for nearly a decade. While he began his industry efforts by purchasing and renovating cheap residential buildings in high-potential neighborhoods, he has since expanded his investments to large-scale commercial and residential properties in vibrant neighborhoods. Here, Jason Cohen provides a few tips to new landlords.  

 

You’ve finally done it. You’ve purchased the building, touched up the paint, laid the carpet, and put your first investment property up for rent. But as the inquiries come in, you realize that the easy part is over – now, you have to deal effectively with your tenants. Jason Cohen Pittsburgh is an advising group operating in the city; as such, its veteran members have heard their fair share of first-time rental horror stories. It’s common for a first-time investor to be so caught up in the buy and the renovation process that they find themselves at a loss when they need to communicate professionally with the people living in their units. Unfortunately for landlords, the work doesn’t end when the contractors leave. Below, Jason Cohen, head of Jason Cohen Pittsburgh lists a few tips for aspiring landlords to take note of before opening their doors to tenants.

 

Be Assertive

Everyone has an off month now and again. Sometimes, a tenant can’t make a payment on the day it comes due – and in some cases, that’s okay. Landlords should be empathetic and understanding if a tenant faces tragedy or finds himself in a temporary financial crunch, so long as the tenant communicates the situation. If, however, the tenant chooses to go dark and refuse to pay the agreed-upon rental sum, landlords need to act assertively. You need the rent they owe you to keep up the building and make a profit. Being overly understanding to an elusive or underpaying tenant will only result in your missing needed funds. Be assertive! Don’t be afraid of pursuing a delinquent tenant for the money they owe you.

 

Check Credit and References

Never rent to someone who doesn’t have a job or has a credit score of under 600. Those without the means to pay rent or a history of regular repayment will inevitably leave you waiting for payments that may never come. Screen your potential tenants closely to ensure that they will be responsible, reliable occupants who will care for your unit and pay on time.

 

Make Smart Renovations

Don’t install marble countertops if your unit is in a low-income neighborhood. In all likelihood, those that inquire about your unit will be looking to pay a rent in line with those offered in nearby homes; if you try to cover a fancy renovation by asking a significantly higher rent, your prospective tenants will walk. Be smart, and don’t risk renovations that offer little return!

 

Be Organized

Organization is key to any successful business venture. After all, how will you know you made a profit if you have no documentation of the fact? Ensure your success by keeping organized and detailed records!

 

For more tips, advice, and real estate content, please visit Jason’s site at JasonCohenPittsburgh.org.